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Today is World Food Day. Food waste accounts for up to %50 of our produce worldwide. The CRHF has been helping to mitigate this issue in Costa Rica by partnering with supermarkets. We currently pick up 5 car/bus loads of food daily and redistribute it to the most vulnerable populations. This is good, healthy, edible food that for aesthetic purposes or other reasons are no longer sold in stores and would otherwise end up in the land fill- right next to where we instead, provide healthy meals. “The issue is not the lack of resources, it’s the distribution and management of them”. Francisco #worldfoodday #costarica #volunteer #lacarpio #communityservice #nonprofit #foodwaste ... See MoreSee Less
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We would like to thank all individual donors over the years for providing financial support, stability and flexibility. During the last 2 years your donations have become cardinal in our work and have also shown, after 2020 year zero volunteers, how important it is for our work to have this vital support line. We are strong and more resilient than ever thanks to your support. We would like to invite all our followers to consider joining this cause by pledging 33c/day or $10 a month. If only 1/4 of our 2000 followers pledged $10 monthly, we would have the funds to continue all our work and return to expanding our model in other vulnerable communities. All you have to do is follow the link to our payment methods. Paypal has the option to set an automatic recurring monthly payment. www.crhf.org/donations/Thank you for all the support over the years!Will you help share the dream? ... See MoreSee Less
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Remember the spiral? We are revisiting familiar places and delivering the first set of bunk beds with a wonderful group of enthusiastic adolescents. // construyendo camarotes de nuevo. Re visitando lugares familiares. Gracias a este grupo de voluntarios jóvenes tan entusiasmados! #volunteers #CostsRica #nonprofit #ngo #costaricanhumanitarianfoundation #voluntariado ... See MoreSee Less
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Any given day in La Carpio: volunteer orientation, food bank, extracurricular education, daycare, Montessori, bunk bed building and so much more that goes unmentioned. Thank You for Sharing Our Dream!// Un día en la Carpio: orientación de voluntarios, banco de comida, clases extracurriculares, Montessori, guardería y camarotes. Y todo lo que pasa sin mencionar. Gracias por compartir nuestro sueño! ... See MoreSee Less
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These are the Core Values of the Foundation:Innovation: We develop creative and unique solutions to real social problems.Integrity: We adhere to unyielding standards of transparency, honesty, and accountability.Cooperation: We team with individuals, groups, and organizations from all over the world to realize our vision.Cost Efficiency: We provide cost-effective and economical solutions by minimizing administrative costs and maximizing the productivity of our volunteers.Read more About Us here:www.crhf.org/about-us/ ... See MoreSee Less
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We are very excited to begin our first summer with some normalcy in 2 years and to host several international volunteer groups. Some of you may remember this work table from ~15 years ago. Enough sustainably farmed pine wood was run across that table to build 4,000 bunk beds. Well times have changed and demands for children’s bunk beds increase with burgeoning populations. We are looking forward to providing youth better sleeping conditions and all the benefits this entails on the body and mind of a child who is developing. If you’re interested in joining the efforts we invite you to contact us to learn how you can help. (Yes, that’s the same table, we value every donation preciously)// Estamos muy emocionados de comenzar nuestro primer verano con cierta normalidad en 2 años. Algunos de ustedes recordarán esta mesa de trabajo de hace ~15 años. Se pasó suficiente madera de pino cultivada de forma sostenible sobre esa mesa para construir 4.000 camarotes. Bueno, los tiempos han cambiado y la demanda de camarotes para niños aumenta con la creciente población. Estamos ansiosos por brindar a los jóvenes mejores condiciones para dormir y todos los beneficios que esto conlleva para el cuerpo y la mente de un niño que se está desarrollando. Si está interesado en unirse a los esfuerzos, lo invitamos a contactarnos para saber cómo puede ayudar. ... See MoreSee Less
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8 months ago

Costa Rican Humanitarian Foundation - Fundación Humanitaria Costarricense
Who would’ve thought after all these years how much has been accomplished. Quien hubiera pensado después de tantos años, todo lo que se ha logrado. Gracias por compartir el sueño. ... See MoreSee Less
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"A hanging pedestrian bridge to connect yw indigenous communities should only be used for gentle traffic. It should never be turned into an amusement park ride."Familia Bribri cruzando el puente de hamaca sobre el río Coen en la comunidad de Alto Coen. ... See MoreSee Less
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What would they do without me? Hold on a minute if you are thinking Ive fallen into the depths of ego. Just read about the day today...Case 1...a man, 65 years old just out of the hospital survived covid. Has a list of medicines a mile long. Cries. I have nowhere to go Please i need to rent a room. I knew him when he first arrived...full of hope and energy. He is now so...fragile. i remember when i nearly died from hepatitis...i descibed it as a turtle with no shell. This man needs a warm dry place to sleep and a big plate of chicken soup. He needs rest I give him c12 000. He can pay for a room for three days. His eyes....fear. hope. Gratitude.What would he do without me.Ezekial. Strong, educated indigenous Miskito from Nicaragua. He shares a room with his son . He worked two weeks...a month ago....and hasnt been paid. He is taking a class on how to be a security guard. I give him c10,000 to pay for rent and bus fare to his class. What would he do...??Maria. Single motber. She has a house but no food. Her son cries mommy im hungry. Can we eat an egg? I give her rice and beans. And some fruit vegetables and bread. She cries.Dona Antonia who has helped us out every day cooking all the meals for everyone and anyone...husband died just a few hours ago...not covid...she has to pay to get him cremated. It is $1000. I will call tomorrow to try to get her on a payment plan. What would she do? The 25, 000 colones I give her is now the sole income. She is over sixty years old.Yader is one of our collaborators. He got his covid vaccine two weeks ago and has had pain on the left side of his chest since. He fears .Ariel is our youth intern . He is the sole breadwinner for his motber amd three siblings.I gave him c10,000 extra this week to pay for school supplies for his younger sister. All the while I am with these and many others, there are 30 fully masked and distanced children in the otber room studying math, english, reading and english for exams with our teacher and two volunteers and one university intern. And out in the main room, 30 people are getting fruits vegetables and bread to feed their collective 150 family members.What would they all do without me?And...what would i do without you?This is my chosen life. Because I CAN do something. And what they really want is love.And when i see pictures of war weary afghans or 15,000 desperate Haitins under a bridge I know I am at least doing SOMETHING. ... See MoreSee Less
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The days have been very intense. Went to the indigenous games activity in Gavilan Canta to see what was going on. I never cease to learn..It was stupendous to see the different groups of indigenous gathered in one place..Cabecar, BriBri...then there were the Gnobe, Terraba, Boruca and Guaymi. I loved to watch the arrow shooting, the firewood cutting and the women playing soccer barefoot and sure footed.It was brutally hot and we sweated a lot. But, it was a festival and there was a lot to talk about and learn about. Thanks for Martha Rollins for coming along with me... ... See MoreSee Less
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In honor of Costa Rica's 200th birthday I have been reading these three books. I finished " The History of Costa Rica" which is a concise summary of this country's specialness in English, am now working through Marc Edelmans book which is more political and brings me back to the days of the revolution in el salvador and nicaragua. And...for background Im rereading this tenth grade history textbook which I used in my tutoring program. This book does an excellent job of guiding the reader in critical thinking skills, writing competence and oh yes...the history of humanity. Oh how i wish people could get the depth of understanding that these books provide. I fantasized that our politicians could take these to read. Alas. It is twitter that we have become. ... See MoreSee Less
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Oh the Finca Hope, what a wonderful place! Donated over 15 years ago, we believe the donor is quite happy with the purpose it has been given. When we were first given the 2 hectare piece of land by the river, we were very happy and relieved to know there would be a safe place for the 40+ kids who lived on the streets of San jose to call home and a haven from the cruel times those streets can serve. After about a decade, each of those kids found their way in life, and sadly in some cases, out of it. The Finca of Hope is just that, a place of hope. Following those years with the rambunctious kids, the house needed a lot of love. Francisco and his friend Maria lead the complete renovation of the house. During the years following, the house has served as a space for grandmothers from La Carpio to find a peaceful place away from the overstimulation and overcrowding. A center for youth to learn about the importance of self reliance, self sufficiency, responsibilities, sustainability, teamwork and so many other basic life skills. Pedro and the soccer boys and youth from all the Family Well Being Centers benefit from all the green area, the pool, the green house and learning about farming. Also used as an occasional homestead for emergency living situations for people from all walks of life. Recently thanks to the kindness of a donor we were able to turn the old chicken coop into a overnight stay also for people from all walks of life. We’ve hosted teh soccer boys several nights where they had a campfire and other enjoyable activities. We even farmed the entire hillside a few times and made some money from it. And so the list goes on of how the Finca Hope has brought hope to so many. It takes a lot of resources and love to upkeep this place of hope and we are eternally grateful for everyone who comes here to benefit from it while putting in their grain of sand to maintain and keep it the Finca of Hope. ... See MoreSee Less
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Estamos para servirle....yader, milagro, alcider, harold, antonia, ana, geoconda, renata, elvis, katia, nela, melisa, pedro. marcos ... See MoreSee Less
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Concrete protective initiatives we will take to protect ourselves and those around us1. Masks at all times on everyone2. Hand washing and alcohol frequently3. Cleaning of all surfaces4. Cheerful and respectful greetings5. Continued food distrubution 6. Continued education both virtual and in person7. Limited number of people on site every day..no more than 12 in the food distribution sute and 15 in the two classroom areas. 8. Constant monitoring of state of health for everyone.9. "My Book is My Friend" program which will loan books to children with materials to create displays of their creative inventions about their books10. Special attention to more vulnerable populations like children who show signs of depression, mothers who are overwhelmed, refugees living on the streets, elderly who have problems of loneliness, people who are mourning, teen girls and young mothers...Dont give up on us...because we are not giving up on them. ... See MoreSee Less
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Costa Rica made so much progress in 2020 to hold the corina virus at bay. And CRHF did not stop providing service to all our populations, including animals.Unfortunately we have had an alarming uptic in reported cases...and are facing two weeks of shutdown. It is really hard not to give in to discouragement and crippling sadness HOWEVER...we have a secret weapon which is our TEAM. A group of dedicated individuals who are willing and able to share every day, problem solve, laugh, take care of each other and continue to provide food, shelter, health care, health education, education, funding for small businesses, empathetic listening, compassion and Right Action. And backing us up all the time are our donors who read our stories, know us well and provide essential funding to keep our programs flourishing. In spite of it all...we are blessed. Babies grow and learn to paint, our relationship with cafe britt remains strong and we continue to make bags for them, we continue to supply materials for small business enterprises, and provide infrastructure improvement for houses, clinics, daycare centers and clean water projects. No pandemuc is going to stop us... ... See MoreSee Less
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We got the green light to begin the acueductos. We spent the day yesterday going over the last details with contractor. This contractor is one of a kind. // nos dieron luz verde para iniciar los acueductos . Ayer estuvimos repasando los últimos detalles con el contratista. El es una joya nacional. Quien dijo miedo ... See MoreSee Less
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We are ready and on target.The 800 kids on our lists have school supplies, shoes, uniforms, notebooks, pens, pencils and tutoring support.Not one of our kids failed their grade studying virtually. And now the schools are open and we are ready...no pandemic will keep us down, no matter if our kids live in the most "disadvantaged" neighborhood in the country. Thanks to our two brilliant teachers, Nela and Melisa for your incredible creativity and resilience. ... See MoreSee Less
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Chepe se baña. Go0 to Multiplaza and see what they are doing.It is truly great. ... See MoreSee Less
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Once again I had a visit from the men. Two men. I wish that everyone reading this could sit with me, at my desk and just see these men, feel their presence, find out who they are. Every single one...and there have been hundreds...is polite. dignified...quiet...tense...open...honest...sweet and very very sad. These two men who are around 50+ fought in the original war in Nicaragua..the glorified revolution. But they were against the revolutionary government. They were funded back then by the US government...Reagan's Iran Contra war. And then lost their funding. So...somehow these men have managed to survive in Ortega's Nicaragua but...they joined in a an attempted uprising in April of 2018 and are now in danger of losing their lives if they return to their country. Their families are back there. Both have diabetes. Both are eating only one meal a day. Both are sleeping in a "shelter" made of plastic with a cardboard roof. their "mattress" is a piece of cardboard. they borrow water from a neighboring house. They are so sad that the US abandoned them back in the 80s...and hope that they can once again be supported by the US. And business people who are living in the States. It is obviously such a futile hope. And I am the one to tell them that. The good news is that, because they are registered as refugees, they do have health insurance with the Costa Rican government . So, they have appointments to be checked and can have access to medicine. Cynics might say...why do you get involved with this. Why do you care about these people. And I might answer. Because I am sitting across from them at a desk and I feel them. Because at least I can give them rice and beans and bread and fruits and vegetables and I can LISTEN to them. These guys have survived unbelievable hardship that I would never manage. And they still believe in the goodness of mankind...So, maybe spending some time with me gives them a moment of respite. Tomorrow, they will return for their food. And I will give them bus fare to get back to San Jose...and PS...Not one single person has ever come to me to ask without first offering to work. They give me their credentials, their life experience. But...I don't have work for them. I have so many people helping us now...all needed...that I can't fit more people in. And...as I was talking to these men, I remembered the days of working with the street kids...and how they were seven, eight, nine ten years old...and how they used to find an empty lot, get some cardboard, make a shelter, and sleep in it during the night. What a situation. People living in cardboard structures. The resilience never ceases to astound me. ... See MoreSee Less
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Today we had the meeting of the young mothers. This is a group started by the Adelphi nursing students last year and they have been a terrific source of support for each other ever since. A new member joined us today and honestly, once again, I simply don't know how she was sitting with us calmly and sanely. She has six children.....The father of the first child died suddenly of a heart attack. The father of the next four got picked up by immigration and deported to Nicaragua. One of those children fell into a bucket of water and drowned only to be rescecitated and is now permanently brain damaged. At the age of three this child is the size of a one year old and still has to use diapers and has to drink from bottle. The father of child number six left her...she sued him for child support but, he has gone missing. So she is completely alone with a small baby, a young infant, a handicapped child who all need diapers and formula and three more. And there she was, as calm and well dressed, clean, neat. And her tears flowed down her face. I think to myself...I was a single mother with three missing fathers. I did it alone. But not without a huge amount of stress and difficult times. How can this woman do this? The grieving at the loss of her first husband. Then another one who got taken. and then a third one who just up and left. And in a way, I could understand how hard it must have been for him to take on all those kids. There is no work here for these refugee men. So, he probably just gave up. All the women in our group gave her kind words and we made some jokes and talked to her kindly. I was able to give her a blanket made by our dear friend Irene who has spent her COVID days crocheting. The look of gratitude on her face was so moving. Such a small thing. And Keyla, who had bought formula to feed her baby Theo gave me the formula because she had decided to continue breast feeding. So, tomorrow, this women will return and I will give her the canaster of formula, rice and beans, fruit, vegetables and bread. I think that her kids are eating only one meal a day. For the next few days she will have real food to give them. And in case you are wondering, "If they are so poor, why do they keep on having kids?" One answer is..they love. They meet a man. They fall in love. There is absolutely no money to get sterilized. They don't have a way to figure out how to avoid pregnancy. And abortion is absolutely out of the question here. They love their children. And their children love them back. I would wish there were a system where a mother like this could share custody of her children with the child welfare. But, there is just absolutely no support for this kind of case. Only our small group. To those who are reading this, I hope you realize just how important your donations are. With just ten dollars we can get this young mother the things she needs and that gives her the encouragement to find ways to get out of her situation. It works. I have seen it so many times. Just ten or twenty or fifty dollars can make a miracle. ... See MoreSee Less
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A few months ago, "Maria" as I will call her, came to ask for food. We gave her the basket of fruits, vegetables and bread and she left. Soon to return to complain that the bread was day old, the vegetables were not the kind she liked and she wanted something different. We quickly received her returned items and replaced them. The next day, she came back again only to tell us that she didn't like what she gave. She also rambled a lot as she talked. Our team is very kind and have learned to treat everyone with respect. However, Maria soon became a special case. We didn't know what to do for or with her. Finally, she just stopped coming and was very upset with us. Fast forward to last Monday. Maria appeared once again saying that she had a reference from the psychologist at the local clinic. She needed our help. Honestly, I sat with her for more than an hour and couldn't figure out what she needed. She just went round and round and was unclear about anything. So, I gave her some food and sent her on her way. She came back the next day, crying. "I just need "HELP". So, we sat together and I finally figured out that...she lives in a room the size of her bed. She has no water source in the room and has to go to a neighbor to get water. She uses a bucket to wash her clothes and her dishes. Her husband who is also an elder, makes and tries to sell small cakes so they can eat. But, he goes out all day and often comes home without having sold anything. Sometimes...a simple gesture of kindness can heal a hurting soul. We made a deal with her that we would buy every day ten of the packets of small breads and we would try to sell them for her or, if not, we would give them to the children. With this guaranteed sale, he would be able to buy the ingredients to make more breads and would be able to then buy i food for them each week. As I have said often and continue to believe...it doesn't really matter so much how much money you get on a regular basis, just as long as it is on a regular basis. So, knowing that she will have every day a guaranteed amount of money, once a week fruits and vegetables and once a week rice and beans eased her anxiety. She was finally able to talk to me without crying. And she stopped complaining and unhappiness. The psychologist told her to go out for a walk every day...Dear Lord, I thought...La Carpio is not exactly the kind of place you go to take a therapuetic walk...So...I suggested she get on the bus and get off at the stop right outside the town and walk one block down to a park where there are benches and trees. Healing in nature. It never fails. She also came to our weekly meeting of the refugees and shared with the group. I don't know if these mini solutions will hold her in peace for a sustained amount of time but...the relief on her face when she realzaed that I understood her and had patience and time for her was so wonderful to see.I do bless and keep her in my heart. ... See MoreSee Less
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Recomendación si están en San Jose. Recommended if you are in San Jose today. ... See MoreSee Less
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Gail was part of the live Facebook prior to the releaseof pájaro de fuego. Check it out! ... See MoreSee Less
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Hugo has been such an important part of the group of refugees. As a young boy, he fought with the Contra in the war in Nicaragua. A war that started when a group of revolutionries stormed the state house and took over the government to get rid of the dictator Somoza. That revolution has a long history. Hugo survived, eventually got a plot of land, got married and had seven children and numerous grandchildren. When he first came from Nicaragua, fleeing government violence, he proudly showed us the picture of all his children grouped together...Yesterday, he called me fraught with emotion. His daughter Thelma who had come here to live with him and his wife with her three children and husband, was moving back to Nicaragua. They can't make it here. The PANI is after their children. So, I went to visit this little family group. I thought maybe I could talk them out of going away so they could stay here and maybe even cooperate with the PANI. After all, the kids are hungry. They are thin and malnourished. they have never been to school. Even the oldest boy, who is 14, cant read. the little girl who is only four is very malnourished. Thelma was doing ok, things were getting better. She was selling masks on the street, making and selling fried plantains. The kids were even registered at a school. Somehow they would study by phone. But...her husband got in some kind of trouble ...and he decided they needed to leave right now. Today. It was impossible for me to convince her to stay here. She just wanted to follow her husband. Hugo and his wife are so sad because even they couldn't convince her to stay. Apparently they will go to live on the finca with the sister and her family. And Thelma will be able to sell in the marketplace. There I was...standing there. Tired and hungry myself. In this awful place where they are staying...being charged 120,000 colones for a tiny room with a matress on the floor and a refrigerator and an electric fry pan on a small table and wondering just what to do. I cannot take on the monthly rent for just one family. And...I don't know if they would come to the Foundation on a regular basis. We tried and they didn't. Should I call the PANI? Should I call the police. I wished I could just sweep up these kids and just take them to the finca. But then what? How would I care for three children more? How would I pay for it? I stood there and finally said..here are the exact type of kids that are in the Save the Children commercials. Standing right in front of me. My white privilege was right there with me. I hated that room. that place where they were staying. The expression of ..fear? Hope? Desperation? Sadness? on the face of the kids and their mother and their grandparents. Whqt would you do? ... See MoreSee Less
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On this most holy night when a baby was born in a shed to refugee parents fleeing from government repression and poverty I reflect.In the last two weeks, our organization has provided much needed solace to thousands of people. 800 people received a special Christmas gift. We fed 2000 people with good, healthy food from Auto Mercado. We provided food to 1000 animals at the Zooave rescate rescue center. We gave rent relief to over one hundred families. But most of all...we provided a message of hope and comfort to everyone. Two people were talking suicide. They are now making changes in their lives to be here longer. Two mothers had their babies taken away from them. They are now advocating for their rights and able at least to have visits with their kids. The boys in prison are getting at least their basic needs for food and warmth and friendship met. We continued our wassap presence for everyone to give them encouragement. Not one of our beneficiaries is suffering depression that I know of. Many of the Nicaraguans have made the choice not to go forward with their armed revolution. Women are working together to meet their needs and help each other. The young mother's group has written their first collective poem, using for the first time ever, a computer. The babies are flourishing. Our poverty museum is being visited by many. Our food distribution program is economically self sufficient and is run like a small non profit enterprise by ten people. All the children passed their school grade and many got diplomas for sixth grade, high school and some even university. We all stayed hopeful. No one got COVID because we took extreme cautionary measures and because we educated and were strict with everyone on mask use, hands washed, alcohol, distancing..and caring for one another. So....Don't ask me what day it is...I lost track a long time ago.And, I absolutely completely lost my voice. It was caused by the strain of driving too much in a day, making tough decisions, being unable to meet some of the needs, the weight of the whole thing...the good news is...dear Dr. John Longworth of Clinica Biblica had a virtual consultation with me and of course, as he knows me well...he said, no driving, no carpio, no phone. Of course. And I couldn't say no because he said, "no talking"...I am on a wonderful course of eating when Im hungry, sleeping when I'm tired, writing when I want to and, blessed...reading the stack of books I showed him during our video call. There is a beautiful half moon in a dark starlit sky tonight. I am blessed. I am happy. I am filled with love...People say they can't wait to go back to "normal" life. I will not be doing that. I want to define a new normal for me and all the wonderful people who work with our organization and all the those who benefit. Carpio is a universal sacred space. We will honor that and make sure others do too. And, those books.I've written..well, there will be time this year to get them all out to you. Including a new one called "A Handbook for Humantiarians". The hope is that we will inspire people to be more in touch with their body, mind, heart and soul as they choose their Right Action in the coming times. But first, they heal. So, our indigenous friends are ready and waiting to receive small groups to provide a safe space to process your grief, confusion and ptsd. Veterans of COVID and the political disarray. We send enormous love to everyone who knows us, who has worked with us, who has supported us, who has understood us.And even to the teachers who gave us hard lessons by challenging us. Thanks for Standing by Us. Written this day, December 24, 2020 from Finca Hope Costa Rica. ... See MoreSee Less
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Our group of young mothers is meeting once a week. The theme of this week was soledad. Loneliness. Being alone. I was surprised that almost all of them celebrated being alone as a time of peace. I think...they dont get.much alone time... ... See MoreSee Less
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Ya completamos la fase de las clínicas del proyecto de cooperación con la embajada de Japón y en coordinación con la ADI Cabecar Bajo Chirripo. Se construyeron 6 baños 7600 en las clínicas de pozo azul, palestina, palmera, chumico, namaldi y punta lanza. Además se expandieron 4 salas de espera y en namaldi se expandieron 4 consultorios. Por último se construyó la nueva clínica de punta lanza que incluye 3 consultorios, farmacia y sala de espera. We completed the clinics phase of the cooperation project with the Japanese embassy and in coordination with the ADI Cabecar Bajo Chirripo. 6, 7600 toilets were built in the pozo azul, palestina, palmera, chumico, namaldi and punta lanza clinics. In addition, 4 waiting rooms were expanded and 4 offices were expanded in namaldi. Lastly, the new punta lanza clinic was built, which includes 3 doctor's offices, a pharmacy and a waiting room. #volunteer #costarica #socialwork #nonprofit #indigenous #SDGs ... See MoreSee Less
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All this year, and many previous years, Auto Mercado supermarkets provide us with shelf life expired products to distribute to our populations. Little did I realize that this food would become so essential to so many thousands of people. On Saturday, our team of collaborators who run the distribution program went to visit one of the stores. We prepared a huge poster..pasted in the background were the headlines from this time of Covid. On top of that was pasted the huge words Gracias...and the four hearts of the Foundation logo. And on top of it all, were pictures of the people pasted on hearts, who benefitted from the program. Another poster in large letters said, Auto Mercado and another poster was the lyrics to the song Stand by Me. We stood far away from the team of Auto Mercado employees as we tried to explain to them what their help means to so many. and then we sang "Stand by Me"...to them. We gave each employee a rock, painted with the logo of crhf four hearts painted on it. And, in a beautiful white bag made of soft leather, we included a poem by Jorge de Bravo called Piedra. We were asked not to take any pictures... but the pictures are in my mind. And the heartfelt gratitude of our team for all that Auto Mercado has done for so many during this difficult time. I love those guys who every single day of the week prepare the food in the baskets for us to pick up. And every time we go, check our temperatures, our state of health and ask how we are doing. They are the example of young men who are doing something so good for their society. And our Carpio team who, with great stage fright, spoke and sang of their gratitude. A day well spent... ... See MoreSee Less
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Yesterday I arrived at La Carpio and there was quite a flutter of movement. Tons of police on motorcycles, press, people out on the streets...and in the distance I saw the mayor of san jose Johnny Araya strutting along. I caught up to the reporter and passed her my card for a possible visit. Then, went to prepare the actuvity for the day. 30 minutes later I was surprised to find my car surrounded by ten, yes, ten motorcycle police. Oh for the love of God, what now? The head police guy had his camera out, taking a picture of the car. Apparently I was breaking the Law by parking in that place...the self same place I have parked for the last fifteen years. In his Important Police Voice he told me he was lifting my plates. Oftlog. Keeping very calm, i nicely presented myself as blah blah blah. With my keys in my hand. I gave him the elbow greeting. I asked him a few pertinent questions like, where were you guys ten years ago when there was trafficking of young girls going on. He finally let me drive the car away. Then to find a safe place to park. No small task. When I walked back, there was yet another squad harassing Pedro who was simply dropping off the food. I stood in front of them until all the food was taken out of the car and he drove away. Meanwhile, a bunch of guys in hazmat suits were walking around with a big old hose spraying an unkown substance at everyone. And, believe it or not, yet another group of six uniformed guys later gathered in front of our staircase with Papers in their hands . I invited them up stairs to visit our perfectly clean, socially distanced, masked up, alchol gelled center, with a museum of poverty. They declined. The mayor and all the journalists had departed the scene. Later that day, I got pulled over by seven transit police in San Jose for stopping at a red light with my bumper over the pedestrian walkway . And yet again in the night in the way home at a drug inspection police operative. Both times they let me go. Thank God I speak good spanish. That always throws them for a loop. I wonder what is happening here? Another fun fact. The police in Carpio gave me a bunch of posters to put on the wall. Pictures of smiling uniformed officials with helpful information. One of them shows a female which I found very nice. Until...the refugees told me that she is the selfsame officer who has been known to push them physically when she shows up to confiscate the merchandise they sell on the streets. Quite the day, yes indeed. ... See MoreSee Less
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Every Sunday I pick up the fruits, vegetables and bread from the Auto Mercado in Alajuela. It is an easy pick up because there is less traffic and no other trucks waiting. These products are given to one of our ex collaborators who lives with her daughter and her six children. With the permission of Auto Mercado, they sell the products at low prices to their neighbors and thus have food for themselves and money to cover their light and water bills. Previously, we had upgraded their house by putting in a new roof on the house they had gotten years ago. As I was waiting for her to take the things into her house, Vilma and Cindy passed by. They are the adult daughters of Dona Tere, one of our Abuelas. Between them, these two women have ten children. And between the children there are numerous grandchildren/babies. As I looked at them, I realized...they represent the fourth generation of people we have helped in La Carpio. That is four generations... Not three. Tere; Vilma, Cindy; their children and their children. I believe that is four generations. All of these kids went to our Centro Modelo education center right there on the corner. They were lovingly mentored by Fatima, her daughter Gloria and her daughter. Three generations. And always financed by YOU! The volunteers, the donors, the helpers. Imagine how far we've come. And these are just two examples of generational change created by CRHF. If I add these up, it is more than thirty people's lives improved by us. And not to mention the neighbors who are able to access the good food we provide during this pandemic. ... See MoreSee Less
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his is how we reversed Columbus...with the guidance of local cabecar leader Leonel Garcia we distributed food suplies donated by a capitalist businessman and prepared by a Chinese grocer and protective masks lovingly sewn by a local US expatriate to a remote indigenous population living in quarantine due to a deadly disease. Accompanied by a Costa Rican engineer who went to give engineering approval of the brand new clinic built with funds from the Japanese people and money and coordination from the indigenous association, the crhf and Fransisco Nystrom, son of a salvadoran political refugee and a US ex patriot. I think that just about covers it.Oh...and I see theres a dog there too...not to mention a gorgeous steer and several watchful hawks. ... See MoreSee Less
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In the concentration camps people who survived looked for a purpose in their lives.i told our kids today1. This will not last forever2. When you hear the sirens of the ambulances, pray for the person who is inside3. Make movies in your mind. Make up stories as you go to sleep4. Write womething every day in your workbook5. Talk to God6. Get up and out of your sleeping clothes every day.7. Brush your teeth every day.8. Practice smiling.9. Keep breathing.10. Make something with the materials in your rainy day boxes.I know more than ever how much they need us ... See MoreSee Less
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We are doing hybrid teaching...some online and some in person. With small groups of ten or less. Since mothers day is on Sunday here, our teachers cooked up a little celebration with our kids. In theory it was a happy moment. They made signs, cards and a little gift for each of us. They played some music, they had a lovely little fruit snack and a chocolate cake.everyone was masked up and distanced. No one touched or hugged. But...i noticed one little five year old boy was "not there". And as I watched him, i felt that he was vacant. And i looked at the others. And they were the same. It was a look of fear. Of depression. Of checking out. Of no connection. They tried. But it was as if singing or smiling or even speaking was too much effort or energy. This is the result of living inside a tin shack with no windows watching tv all day and eating only small amounts of food. Hollow children. We have our work set up for us. Breathing life and hope back into the souls of these depleted and ever so dear children. ... See MoreSee Less
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2 years ago

Costa Rican Humanitarian Foundation - Fundación Humanitaria Costarricense
El clima cedió permitiendo el paso de los materiales para la clínica de punta lanza. \\\ a window in the weather allowed for the delivery of materials for the clinic of Punta Lanza. #nonprofit #costarica #ong #ngo #cabecar #limon @ Chirripó, Limon, Costa Rica ... See MoreSee Less
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2 years ago

Costa Rican Humanitarian Foundation - Fundación Humanitaria Costarricense
El clima cedió permitiendo el paso de los materiales para la clínica de punta lanza. \\\ a window in the weather allowed for the delivery of materials for the clinic of Punta Lanza. #nonprofit #costarica #ong #ngo #cabecar #limon @ Chirripó, Limon, Costa Rica ... See MoreSee Less
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I saw in facebook a picture of the husband of one of our original teachers from the beginning years. I have such fond memories of him because years ago we did a very powerful session with him to help him heal some trauma. I went to visit today...and indeed...he turns out to be the first person to die of corona who I know personally. I am immensely sad. He had sych a loving relation with his wife and he was such a good father. Yep. He was one of the good ones. Sad. ... See MoreSee Less
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Some people ask why I keep working with the refugees. Here's one reason. Hugo, ex contra combatant in the revolution of the 80s came to see me with his family today. They got kicked out of their place to sleep in san jose. He has been invited to go to the mountain where he would be paid to help prepare the overthrow of the government. He told them..."i dont want to fight anymore. I learned from coming to the foundation that war is not an answer. I learned how to think and act differently now. You taught me this. I wont ever fight again."And this, just this... is enough to keep me going. ... See MoreSee Less
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Si o NoWe are sponsoring two youth in prison. Both have been with us since very young. So...i decided to challenge one if the boys to a si o no experience. When he called I said,,,Im going to ask you some questions about what happened when you lived with us. You have a choice...you can say the truth and i will not judge you, or you can evade, avoid or lie. But...i really need to know the truth. And you have nothing to lose by saying si...because you are in jail and everyone around you has corona and yoy havent had a visitor in months. First question, did you do drugs while living in the house...pause...pause..."si pero"...nope its a one word answer...no pero allowed. Did you steal while you lived in the house..."bueni,,,quizas a veces" it is a one word answer...and so it went...question by question...and each time he said si...i felt a lightness in my body because each time i could say i forgive you...God forgives you. Thank you for telling the truth because your truth is taking away the dark shadow of self doubt and and suspicion i have carried with me...by this time we are both crying...me in relief, he in gratitude. And, oddly enough, my raspy throat cleared up and got strongerThere are so many things I want and need to say...and at this point I have nothing to lose. And he said...thank you for all you did for us for all those years and for what you are doing now. ... See MoreSee Less
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The setting: sitting by the little pool as the moon floats slowly by The action: reflecting on the happenings of the day.Result: it's really, really hard to be alive right now.So much heavy sadness. ... See MoreSee Less
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The future of hope in the world. We are seeing five to ten kids at a time in family units. ... See MoreSee Less
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No creamos estos boletines informativos muy a menudo porque toman tiempo y en lo personal yo dudo mucho los números que se publican. Pero para que se den una idea, gracias a el trabajo en equipo y apoyo de muchas personas y organizaciones con un gran corazón, hemos podido seguir dando algunos servicios urgentes durante estos tiempos de tanta incertidumbre. - Francisco We don't create these info sheets too often because they take time and personally doubt the numbers published in others similar. But so you all get an idea, thanks to the team work and support from many people and organizations with a big heart, we have been able to continue giving some urgent services during these times of so much uncertainty. - Francisco ... See MoreSee Less
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I think we can learn from the dolphins and create pod schools. Small groups of several families guided by aware, competent teachers in beautuful spaces in nature working and learning together to create wisdom based learning for the evolution of society. Factory models of education should become obsolete. Aware teachers will enthuastically embrace this new way. Im ready. Who wants to join me? Kilore school is ready. Fired up, ready to go. Lets go. ... See MoreSee Less
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Here is nelas four year old son reading Brown Bear Brown Bear to the children in the wasup group. Later today my assignment is to read it in English. ... See MoreSee Less
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As we were waiting fir food delivery today, we talked about the hardship of keeping kids entertained and busy on shutdown. The conversation wandered and meandered until we got to. .how about if we have two or three mothers come with their kids each day and we teach them what they need to know about their assignments being given by the ministry of education? Meli and nela are already doing virtual classes on wasup. Our physical classroom is big enough to have distancing and the idea is to use our great library as enrichment. The moms loved the idea... ... See MoreSee Less
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We did a difficult activity today. We wrote our "just in case" letters to our families. You could have heard a pin drop for more than an hour as everyone wrote and drew. ... See MoreSee Less
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I had a plan to do street art with the refugees living in San Jose as part if our Tuesday encounter. But, one week it rained, another week we didnt get there on time, another week we couldnt get into the parking lot where we meet. We gave out food and checked up on everyone...finally today was a lovely warm sunny day with blue skies and bright white clouds . I remembered to bring my box of big chalk. So...i traced my hand on the curb. And passed the chalk to someone else. I stepped back and watched as everyones eyes lit up and one by one they came forward to trace their own or their childrens hands. The idea was to have the traced hands touch each other. I wrote..."te doy una mano" .. i give you a hand.Once again i was so moved to see Hugos hand as he traced it...his fingers are long and slender and something like elegant. Not a farm workers hands. More like a pianists hands. And then he leaned over to help his little grandchild trace her hand. The whole project was so simple but you would think we had painted the Sistine chapel ceiling what with all the reverence. A moment in time. Shared. ... See MoreSee Less
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Out of the shutdown room he shares with his mother, siblings and grandparents. And for five precious minutes, he was just a boy in a park, climbing a tree, chasing pigeons and playing hide and seek with his little sister. Then he gets a deliscious hearty hot lunch. ... See MoreSee Less
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Where is UNHCR Costa Rica? Working from home??????? ... See MoreSee Less
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Hagamos un plan....this is what Ive been doing all my life and it is a very common phrase in Costa Rica..."lets make a plan" it means...lets think together...lets share ideas...lets do something...it is about thinking, sharing and doing. And it akways ends up with something happening. And often there is a result. So...on tuesday afternoons we take food to the half of the nicaraguan group that doesnt live in la carpio. I visualize them like dandelion seeds blowing in the wind..here, there and everywhere. Our visit is what brings them together and anchors them to the shore for a short while. This week it was different...what i saw was a quietness. A desperation in their eyes. Sadness. Something like defeat. They were thinner. What has happened? All assistance to them has ended. That little lunch we brought was their first real food all week. They are behind on the rental for their rooms. And they are at risk of being evicted. I just did not know what to say...they are elders, fathers, mothers, grandparents and children. I thought and thought . Surely i could say some right thing. Something about God loves you at least. But looking in their eyes...the words did not come out. What hope could i give them when there is no hope that i could discern. I said...you know i always have a plan. I dont have a plan today. I am sin palabras. Just...come back on friday and i will bring food. That is the plan. The only plan i can pull out of the hat. Food on friday. Hagamos ese plan ... See MoreSee Less
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Once again, I am protected here. Kind of. I wanted to get a bag of goodies into the prison to help Eric out. He says that they have cut the size of proportions to half lately. So, I got everything all ready...the roasted chicken, the arroz con pollo, the sweet bread, the little epanadas and the ever important clear gel deosdorant. I had a lady check all my packaging, the plastic bags, everything..because they always find something to reject. So far so good. I getthrough the first checkpont, my ID is okay. go to the second section and lo and behold, it turns out that if you are over sixty years old you can't drop tings off. Wel, of course I got on my high horse and started muttering about my rights are being violated and what was I going to do with all this food, etc etc. The guard very calmly informed me that I can go make a complaint as much as I want but they dont want me in the prison for anything; I gave it up and turned back to see a very nice young woman there who offered to bring the stuff in for me. I accompanid her to the gates while she signed in and then waited outside to make sure she did her job. The whole hting only took abut four hurs; Prgress s being made;;; ... See MoreSee Less
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You should laugh more, they say. You should have more fun. It is like therapy to laugh. Hmmm I say. It would be more therapy if people could find a room to sleep in and pay for it every night. Or to know their kids would get fed today. But, nevertheless..We did have a lighthearted moment today ..while waiting for the fruits and vegetabels to be delivered, we got out a speaker and started playing music and before we knew it everyone was happily dancing to the music. Keeping distance, which made it more fun, and breathing through masks. All these years of living here and I still just cant move like the Latins do. But we always have a great laugh about it. ... See MoreSee Less
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With a donation from a friend of crhf and her friends, we were able to do the following in the past few days:Give rent relief and food to an elder man who was featured on facebook because he was kicked out of his small apartment for not paying. He was so appreciative for this, but, I think, also, for the chance to talk to me for a while. He is 72 years old and has lived in Carpio for 15 years. He came from Nicaragua..has no wife and no children as far as he knows. He gets a small stipend from the Costa Rican government which barely lets him survive. He fell behind in his rent. Give funds to a refugee woman so she can move into a cheaper place that will be more affordable to her.Give a good basic food basket to Elsa who lives by the river and makes her living selling recycled things from the trucks that come in every day. There are no trucks, she has no products to sell. She is not able to feed her family.Drive to San Jose to give out bread to people who are living precariously either on the street or in small rented spaces. This is a group that came here last year and includes several children. We meet in an empty parking lot and talk about life. Their lives. The time spent, the attention given is essential.Provide rice and beans to 29 families in food crisis.Give lunch to our ten collaborators every day this week.Provide a basic food basket to five abuelas of our group.And we will continue with these kinds of initiatives all next week as well. Pictures will be coming. I'm having phone charge issues. ... See MoreSee Less
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Men and women of good. Ninos y ninas de bien. This is what I thought as I shared with teacher Melisa to work with some of our boys on their relationships, dreams, fears....this initiative was started with Nela and Meli to help prepare our kids for a very uncertain future. Last week we worked with the girls, today with the boys. These kids listened wide eyed as we talked bout the beauty of the human body. The design of it. How we can respect our bodies and those of our friends Meli and I tag teamed as we explained how important respect is. Then, she played a song for them, showed them a video and sent them to work in two teams explaining about the partes intimas of the body. They came up with two posters about this topic. Then, each boy wrote something that they were uncomforable with, something they didnt like that happened to them on a piece of paper. The paper was placed in a balloon which was blown up and tied. Each boy then stomped on his balloon and as it popped with a loud sound, said, 'NO ME GUSTA" I didn't like it. This was followed by a drumming circle where the boys could pound all they wanted.The look of gratitude and relief on all their eyes was so moving. We are using masks full time and getting used to it. I am learning to communicate with my eyes...I smile with my mouth but I'm pretty sure they see the smile in my eyes. It is an art.This is what I'm here for. This. ... See MoreSee Less
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As with many of you who are friends with crhf and have followed us over the years, you can imagine that financially we are at rock bottom. We have always tried to keep ahead of the requests we get for assistance and to find dignified and and sustainable ways to provide the correct aid at the correct time. For the most part, we have been successful and have provided for many thousands of people in the long, medium and short term. Our model of development is consistently tested, tweaked, reformed and re created. We count on our enthusiastic volunteers and the companies that sponsor them to provide us donation money for their volunteer hotels, bus transport, educational visits and their own projects while they are with us. BC...Before Corona...this system was functional, especially with the additional donations of the Palmedo Family Foundation, Gary Kaplan, Wells Mountain Initiative, Epstein Ross Family Foundation, Nystrom Family and Jeff Fischer. In some years, others have given donations to us as well requesting certain projects be completed.However...AC .After Corona...we are unable to be true to our mission. Although we are providing food to hundreds of people with the collaboration of the Auto Mercado supermarkets, and are working with a skeletal group of collaborators, we cannot meet normal expenses such as rents, internet, telephone, transportation and maintenance. We also owe stipend money to all our teachers. We know that the women, children and fathers of La Carpio are not able to make their expenses either. In addition, we are supporting the construction on the indigenous reserve with funding and a group of 80 Nicaraguan refugee families who many of you met last year when they first came here.In this time of re organization of restaurants, hotels, recreational areas, etc. we are also re structuring and would like to make a request/challenge to those of you who can understand and appreciate our work. Our request is for 50 people to make an ongoing monthly contribution to our work of $40 per month. This would be a total of $2,000 per month for us. With this, we can meet our basic needs and continue to fulfill our mission. According to the statistics, we have over 1,000 followers. Our hope is that at least 50 of you can help us with either the ongoing donation or one lump sum . I know that most people are struggling to keep going, just as we are, but we hope you can see that your act of financial compassion can mean a difference for a mother living on the street with her children, a baby who can get diapers and milk, a refugee who can get some rent relief on the room they have rented. This amount is less than $10 per week for one year. Not so much in the grand scheme of things.I hope everyone reading this knows that it is very necessary and that we are not requesting such a great amount. It is easy to do...go online to crhf.org and click on donate. There you will see how you can use paypal to do this. So far, we have been gifted lump sums totaling $1,000 in the last two months. Many thanks to all of you for coming through for us. My heart breaks every day when these dignified, sincere women, men and children come to me asking for a few colones to make rent or pay electricty or get milk for their babies. It is a very difficult position to be in to have to turn them away.These people who are struggling to climb up out of poverty deserve to get continued support from those of us who are more fortunate. ... See MoreSee Less
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And...each of these men said, i have never had to ask for money in my Life. I have always made my own living. Their quuet dignity is inspirational. ... See MoreSee Less
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The men. Today this very sweet man came to ask if i could give him work. He was formally employed by a constructión company for two years because he is an electricista. He showed me his business card. His company folded and he was laid off . He can do electricty, computer, cell phone. I really need an electricista at the finca because our Bill is outrageously high. Tomorrow he is coming to take a look. I have no money to pay him...he us willing to do It on crédito. I wonder if this is one of those times that God provides?To me and to him? ... See MoreSee Less
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The men. We have had a New collaborator for the last two weeks. Today i discovered that he has veterinaria experiencia. In Nicaragua he had a large farm with animales, inckydibg twenty horses that he used to rent to tourists to go on moonlit rides to the lake in Granada. I could just Imagine myself going on an Adventureland like that.who knew he had a Life once. And now here he is handing out Bread to people for twenty dollars a week? ... See MoreSee Less
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The men. Today on the way to get the food, an older man, fairly well dressed with a cloth suitcase clutched to his chest came towards my car to ask for a Coín. I gave it to him and asked, where are you from...he stammered a bit and said " Bagaces" which us a town Up north. I asked why he came to San José and he didnt answer. Then i realized...you are Nicaraguan arent you? He looked frightened and said, no, no. And i realized he is pribably one of those fleeing here. I imagined how hard he must be having It now, living on the street away from his family, scared to Be discovered. Lonely. Hopeful. Polite. Gentle. This is how i Saw him. The light turned Green. The car behind me honked. I moved on. ... See MoreSee Less
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Our team of food and education providers are doing a great job evolving systems to care for our population as needed. they have devised a hand washing station with clean water, sudsy soap, paper towels, trash can and alcohol gel ...before they come in the door. We have set up chairs with a mark on the floor of two meters apart so people can sit. Our food distribution is in another room and only four people can come in at a time. The preparation of the food bags is done in another room by only two people who keep a distance.They prepare the baskets and someone goes to give them to the person waiting in the chairs. In the kitchen only two people are permitted and all surfaces are constantly cleaned with acohol and wiped down with cloths that are boiled every day. The dish washing is done in a sink that is disinfected with soapy water and warm water. Everyone is wearing a mask. It just feels safer to us that way. So far, not one person has shown symtpoms of an illness. Most of the people are still able to donate 2,500 colones to get a bag of fruit and vegetable and a bag of high quality bread. Thus, we are able to pay our two drivers who go to six supermarkets to pick up product, two people who process the bags and make sure everyone gets served properly, two who collate the items for the bags and two who cook and clean. Financially almost independent.If someone is not able to pay, we don't turn them away. There are grandmothers raising children, mothers who lost their jobs because of employers being nervous or not having funds to pay salaries....There are men who have not been able to find work and so we provide a bit of food for them. We also give a bag of food to each of our grandmothers. Our education team has just completed a four week cycle of assisting the children with their MInistry of Education requirements for the virtual learning program. It was tutoring by wassap...Now we will start developing our own lessons with ideas to do at home, rainy day boxes and general motivational messages to everyone.As the refugees have said, they survived war, hunger, poverty, earthquakes, hurricanes, government repression, gender inequalities, illness, homelessness. What is a little virus to them? But they know how to take care of themselves because...they intend to survive. They know how to do it. ... See MoreSee Less
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Costa Rica hits it out of the ball park again.....We had notification of some people infected with the virus in la Carpio...they have been doing testing of everyone and these cases came up. So, what did this government do? They drove in ambulances to the house where the people live. They were accompanied by two public security vehicles. The people got into the ambulance and were driven to...believe it or not, a local San Jose Hotel where they will be cared for so they monitor how their symptoms are progressing. You know, this quarintine for this family will be a blessing. They will be cared for in a clean, safe environment and eat better than ever. And they will have excellent medical care.Here, every life matters. And...this morning I drove Nela to her son Benji's school where she and all the other parents were welcomed...One by one, in the most orderly fashion - because they all had a designated time to arrive, they were greeted by one person at the gate with alcohol, one person telling them which desk to go to, a person having them sign in...with their own pen...and another person handing them a plastic bag with a good week's worth of food. She placed the black bags into her own bag, which had been sprayed with alcohol. Everyone was wearing a mask and no one got closer than two meters apart. She was in and out in five minutes. This is financed by the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Health ..instead of serving lunches to the students every day they are giving every family basic food baskets every two weeks. Financially possible. ... See MoreSee Less
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What a beautiful day. We tried a new structure for our work with the Nicaraguans. The ones who live in La Carpio prepared lunch, bags of bread, bags of clothing, a hot meal, juice and an art project to take into San Jose and meet with the group that lives in the city. We practiced social distancing, but still met our goal of supporting our population. The theme for the day was "I WILL survive". I asked each group what they had survived in their lives..war, hunger, poverty, government repression, hurricanes, earthquakes, gender violence, illness...they all raised their hands for each of these. Except the men for gender violence. So, then I said, what have we been studying for the last year together? The true meaning of life, how to process and carry on after trauma, the important things to each of us, how to use art to process, the process of Re evolution. So, I asked, what makes you think a virus is going to get you. Everyone washed their hands, used gel, stayed two meters apart and wore masks. It is good to believe in God and destiny but it is also good to "tie your camel to a tree". We are so blessed. How incredible. Who would have thought in these times, this kind of greatness would come along. And they are all mourning the loss of their loved ones in their country. And the loss of their homeland as they once knew it. but, the gratitude they have for Costa Rica is immeasurable. No photos because I didn't have time. I was too busy talking, giving out lunch, showing them their art project. It was wonderful. ... See MoreSee Less
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Amazing experience for everyone. ... See MoreSee Less
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The sanitation project for the Cabecar bajo Chirripo sponsored by the Japanese in coordination with the CRHF started this week, step one delivering the materials to 5 different locations. Took logistics and team work where the entire community is involved. José and the guys have stared building now. @ Zent, Limon, Costa Rica ... See MoreSee Less
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The indigenous project if six clinics and three wáter systems continúes to lurch along. Fransisco is a real Hero as he deals with the minute details. We are NOT quiting ... See MoreSee Less
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This is a little long but It helps me to stay focused on the importance of our relationship with the bribri, cabecar, huetar, terraba and boruca Friends we have. Fransisco continúes the renlentless Battle to Provide clean wáter and clínics to the cabecares. The unendless hours of bureaucratic requirements of the donor embassy, the interfering factors like cultural festivales of the donors, and now the start of rainy session making the road to the first project impassable and the coronavirus fear mentality would make anyone else throw in the towel. But still he persists. The donor money has languished in the bank since November. I have told him that once the six clinics and three wáter systems are up and running he Will Be greatly rewarded in so Many ways. So Many ways. ... See MoreSee Less
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The Tuesday lunch meeting with the 50 refugees....with Rice from Erin, chicken from Gary Kaplan, vegetables and Bread from automercado, Doña Antonia y geocanda prepared a huge pot of chicken with vegetables, rice, beans and salad and fresco. Using the strictest norma of higiene. We are all so very grateful and Happy. ... See MoreSee Less
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This is Zahorí. She created this piece of art by herself with the materials in her rainy day box. Than you, thank you, thank you. With grateful tears in my eyes. ... See MoreSee Less
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Rainy day boxes .... ... See MoreSee Less
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I know this to Be true. Nelson, Jason, chuki, Pirri, Sandoval, Abram, Jonathan, Eric and all the others. You are worthy and human and real. To me, you are all very real ... See MoreSee Less
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